Do the Rules Regarding Community and Separate Property Apply to Debts in Arizona?


Yes, the rules are the same. For example, any debt owed by either spouse before marriage remains that spouse’s sole and separate debt. Debts incurred after service of the divorce petition are the separate debt of the spouse incurring the debt. There are many exceptions to these general rules.

Sometimes complex issues arise when a creditor of one spouse attempts to collect a separate debt of a spouse by taking the separate property of the other spouse or the community property of both spouses.  The Arizona Supreme Court addressed the limits of a creditor in taking community assets or the separate property of the non-debt owing spouse to satisfy a premarital debt in the case of Forsythe v. Paschal.

You should also read our in depth article on the Arizona Court of Appeals decision in the SPQR v. Robertson case, or you may watch the video below about that case.

SPQR v. Robertson | Community Liability for Separate Debt

 

How Are Debts Between Spouses Decided in Arizona

Do the Rules Regarding Community and Separate Property Apply to Debts in Arizona?

Do the Rules Regarding Community and Separate Property Apply to Debts in Arizona?

There are situations when one spouse owes a debt to the other spouse when, for example, a spouse loans the other spouse money from a separate property account. The Arizona Court of Appeals in the case of Johnson v Johnson held the divorce court is not authorized by any laws in Arizona to address loans between spouses. A separate civil lawsuit would have to be filed by one spouse against the other to collect upon any such personal loans between the spouses.

Is a Spouse’s Separate Property Liable for Community Debts

The Arizona Court of Appeals in the case of Union Bank v. Pfeffer held that a creditor might come after community assets but usually cannot come after the separate property of a spouse to pay a community debt. The exception to this general rule would occur if both spouses signed, for example, a promissory note to a creditor. In that situation, both the community and each spouse’s separate property could be taken by a creditor as they are binding both themselves and their community to the obligation.

Contact Our Scottsdale Arizona Community Property Attorneys

Call us at (480) 305-8300 to schedule a consultation with one of our Scottsdale and Phoenix Arizona Community Property Attorneys regarding Arizona community property laws or any other Arizona family law matter.