Joint v Sole Custody AZ

Everyone knows what is being discussed when the word divorce comes up. Most even know that the phrase dissolution of marriage is a legal phrase used to replace the more common word of divorce. But not nearly as many are clear about the other phrases thrown around frequently during Arizona divorce proceedings.

Child Custody: The care, control, and maintenance of a child. A child custody determination means a judgment, decree, or other order of a court that provides for the legal custody, physical custody, or visitation with respect to a child.

Legal Decision Making: This is the phrase that has taken the place of the phrase “child custody” in Arizona courts.

Parenting Time: Another term for visitation. Arizona courts attempt to ensure that the child continues to have a meaningful relationship with both their parents by ordering parenting time that continues contact with both parents. Parenting time could be limited or denied by the court depending upon what is best for the child.

Most parents often want to know whether joint or sole custody is best for their children. In most situations, both parents are involved in making the major decisions regarding raising their child: health care, education, religion, residence, etc. When parents are married, they aren’t required to seek a legal right to decision making for their child. But if there is a disagreement regarding which parent has the right to make a decision, or if government officials find that one or both parents are unfit for decision-making on their child’s behalf, the family courts will intervene to make a decision that is in the best interests of the child.


 

Factors for Sole v Joint Custody in Arizona

When a married couple seeks a dissolution of marriage, the final divorce decree includes information regarding legal decision making and parenting time for any children of the couple getting divorced. The information the court considers, to name a few, when coming to a decision regarding a divorcing couple’s children include:

The child’s wishes.
The child’s relationship with each of their parents.
Adjustments the child will need to make in relation to school, home, community, etc.
The child and parents’ mental and physical health.
Issues with domestic violence or child abuse.
Parents’ completion of programs required by Arizona state law.
Agreement/disagreement between parents regarding legal decision making and parenting time.
Ability of each parent to communicate with each other and the child effectively.